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ABOUT CONFERENCE

EAPM is in the vanguard driving forward the concept of personalised medicine in Europe and beyond. With its broad base of stakeholders, drawn from industry, academia, science, research, the healthcare professions, patient groups, policymakers and more, the Alliance brings together key motivated and expert personnel from a wide range of EU Member States.

Setting the agenda with its STEPs campaign, which stands for Specialised Treatment for Europe’s Patients, and its SMART Outreach programme, EAPM is working tirelessly to achieve the goal of ‘the right treatment for the right patient at the right time’ to help create a healthier Europe for its 500 million citizens across 28 countries.

Although a young alliance, EAPM’s achievements in the field of personalised medicine have already been notable. A highly successful debut conference, held under the auspices of the Irish Presidency of the EU in Dublin, 2013, and three follow-up events in Brussels in 2014-2016 (under the Italian, Luxembourg and Dutch presidencies respectively), have been augmented by numerous position papers, myriad high-level workshops held in the European Parliament seats of both Brussels and Strasbourg, a swathe of press coverage and EAPM-penned articles, cross-party backing from influential MEPs plus regular interaction with relevant departments in the European Commission.

The Alliance’s fifth annual conference, to be held once again in the historic Bibliothèque Solvay in Brussels, will build on these solid foundations and aims to raise awareness among policymakers about the needs of modern-day patients and how personalised medicine has the potential to change healthcare for the better.

 
WHY ATTEND?
- Politicians

EAPM’s fifth annual conference will, like the first four editions, pull together leading experts in the arena of personalised medicine drawn from patient groups, payers, healthcare professionals plus industry, science, academic and research representatives.

The theme will be: “Innovation and Screening in Lung Cancer - The Future” and will once again be held in the historic Bibliothèque Solvay in Brussels.

As long ago as December 2003, EU health ministers unanimously adopted a Recommendation on cancer screening, which acknowledged both the significance of the burden of cancer and the evidence for effectiveness of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening in reducing the burden of disease.

At that point, EU guidelines updated and expanded for breast and cervical cancer screening had already been published by the Commission, while comprehensive European guidelines for qual-ity assurance of colorectal cancer screening were being prepared.

Thirteen years on and incidence and mortality rates of cancers still vary widely across the EU, reflecting a major health burden in various Member States, often splitting large and smaller countries along with richer and poorer nations. Therefore, there needs to be concrete actions at the EU level and Member State level. Despite the EU’s substantial efforts, overall the bloc is still only around half-way towards imple-menting the Recommendation. Not only that, but slightly less-than-half of the population who should be covered by screening (according to the Recommendation itself) actually are.

Meanwhile, less-than-half of examinations performed as part of screening programmes actually meet with all the stipulations of that now-ageing Recommendation. This illustrates the need for greater efforts, supported by collaboration between Member States and professional, organisational and scientific support for those countries seeking to implement or improve population-based screening programmes.

The Alliance and the Commission both agree that substantial added value may be expected from such support and from additional efforts to improve and maintain the high quality of screen-ing programmes.

It remains the case that the volume of activities is still far from the level which can be hoped for and worked towards in the future. In the last few years EAPM has been involved in shaping the agenda for the advancement of personalised medicine via conferences, meetings, reports, media engagement, its Working Groups and by helping to table many amendments in the European Parliament in relation to re-levant legislation.

EAPM believes there is a need for action across all disease areas - and lung cancer is quite clearly a major one, if not the major one. And the biggest cancer killer of all does not have a solid set of screening guidelines across Europe.

EAPM is driving forward the concept of personalised medicine in Europe and beyond, as set out in its ongoing STEPs campaign, and is working tirelessly to reach the goal of ‘the right treatment for the right patient at the right time’. This will go a long way towards creating a healthier Europe for its 500 million citizens across 28 countries.

Below are several good reasons why you should attend:

  • An opportunity for you to learn more about the issues surrounding personalised medicine, its huge potential and how it can change the lives of millions of patients (including many of your constituents) for the better
  • The chance to hear the opinions of experts first hand on lung cancer screening and guidelines, as well as respond to and pose your own questions on the day
  • The chance to understand how an integrated, coherent, cost-effective and cohesive EU health strategy will impact on systems and the standard of care in your own Member State
  • The opportunity to see into the minds of all the stakeholders, understand their issues and find out what they really feel they need from you
  • An excellent chance to network with (and be interviewed by) health journalists. Also, to meet industry leaders, cutting-edge scientists and all other PM stakeholders from your own country and across the EU
- Press

EAPM’s fifth annual conference will take the theme: “Innovation and Screening in Lung Cancer - The Future” and will once again be held in the historic Bibliothèque Solvay in Brussels.

The Alliance’s fifth annual conference will, like the first four (held under the auspices of the Irish Presidency of the EU, and the Italian, Luxembourg and Dutch presidencies consecutively), pull together leading experts in the arena of personalised medicine drawn from patient groups, payers, healthcare professionals plus industry, science, academic and research representatives.

Also present will be legislators and policymakers in the form of MEPs and Commission officials. The aim of the conference is to set the agenda for European healthcare during the next five years of EU legislation.

As long ago as December 2003, EU health ministers unanimously adopted a Recommendation on cancer screening, which acknowledged both the significance of the burden of cancer and the evidence for effectiveness of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening in reducing the burden of disease. At that point, EU guidelines updated and expanded for breast and cervical cancer screening had already been published by the Commission, while comprehensive European guidelines for qual-ity assurance of colorectal cancer screening were being prepared.

Thirteen years on and incidence and mortality rates of cancers still vary widely across the EU, reflecting a major health burden in various Member States, often splitting large and smaller countries along with richer and poorer nations. Therefore, there needs to be concrete actions at the EU level and Member State level. Despite the EU’s substantial efforts, overall the bloc is still only around half-way towards imple-menting the Recommendation. Not only that, but slightly less-than-half of the population who should be covered by screening (according to the Recommendation itself) actually are.

Meanwhile, less-than-half of examinations performed as part of screening programmes actually meet with all the stipulations of that now-ageing Recommendation. This illustrates the need for greater efforts, supported by collaboration between Member States and professional, organisational and scientific support for those countries seeking to implement or improve population-based screening programmes.

The Alliance and the Commission both agree that substantial added value may be expected from such support and from additional efforts to improve and maintain the high quality of screen-ing programmes.

It remains the case that the volume of activities is still far from the level which can be hoped for and worked towards in the future.

In the last few years EAPM has been involved in shaping the agenda for the advancement of personalised medicine via conferences, meetings, reports, media engagement, its Working Groups and by helping to table many amendments in the European Parliament in relation to re-levant legislation.

EAPM believes there is a need for action across all disease areas - and lung cancer is quite clearly a major one, if not the major one. And the biggest cancer killer of all does not have a solid set of screening guidelines across Europe.

EAPM is driving forward the concept of personalised medicine in Europe and beyond, as set out in its ongoing STEPs campaign, and is working tirelessly to reach the goal of ‘the right treatment for the right patient at the right time’. This will go a long way towards creating a healthier Europe for its 500 million citizens across 28 countries.

Below are several good reasons why you should attend:

  • An opportunity for you to learn more about the issues surrounding PM, its huge potential and how it can change the lives of millions of patients (including many of your readers) for the better
  • The chance to hear the opinions of experts first hand and pose your own questions on the day
  • The possibility of interviewing the politicians and policymakers who are in the driving seat when it comes to designing the EU healthcare roadmap for the coming years
  • Excellent networking opportunities with fellow health journalists, industry leaders, cutting-edge scientists and all other stakeholders from your own country and across the EU
  • The chance to understand how an integrated, coherent, cost-effective and cohesive EU health strategy will impact on systems and the standard of care in your own Member State
- EU and Member State policymakers

EAPM’s fifth annual conference will take the theme: “Innovation and Screening in Lung Cancer - The Future” and will once again be held in the historic Bibliothèque Solvay in Brussels.

The Alliance’s fifth annual conference will, like the first four (held under the auspices of the Irish Presidency of the EU, and the Italian, Luxembourg and Dutch presidencies consecutively), pull together leading experts in the arena of personalised medicine drawn from patient groups, payers, healthcare professionals plus industry, science, academic and research representatives.

Also present will be legislators and policymakers in the form of MEPs and Commission officials. The aim of the conference is to set the agenda for European healthcare during the next five years of EU legislation.

As long ago as December 2003, EU health ministers unanimously adopted a Recommendation on cancer screening, which acknowledged both the significance of the burden of cancer and the evidence for effectiveness of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening in reducing the burden of disease. At that point, EU guidelines updated and expanded for breast and cervical cancer screening had already been published by the Commission, while comprehensive European guidelines for qual-ity assurance of colorectal cancer screening were being prepared. Thirteen years on and incidence and mortality rates of cancers still vary widely across the EU, reflecting a major health burden in various Member States, often splitting large and smaller countries along with richer and poorer nations. Therefore, there needs to be concrete actions at the EU level and Member State level. Despite the EU’s substantial efforts, overall the bloc is still only around half-way towards imple-menting the Recommendation. Not only that, but slightly less-than-half of the population who should be covered by screening (according to the Recommendation itself) actually are. Meanwhile, less-than-half of examinations performed as part of screening programmes actually meet with all the stipulations of that now-ageing Recommendation. This illustrates the need for greater efforts, supported by collaboration between Member States and professional, organisational and scientific support for those countries seeking to implement or improve population-based screening programmes.

The Alliance and the Commission both agree that substantial added value may be expected from such support and from additional efforts to improve and maintain the high quality of screen-ing programmes. It remains the case that the volume of activities is still far from the level which can be hoped for and worked towards in the future. In the last few years EAPM has been involved in shaping the agenda for the advancement of personalised medicine via conferences, meetings, reports, media engagement, its Working Groups and by helping to table many amendments in the European Parliament in relation to re-levant legislation.

EAPM believes there is a need for action across all disease areas - and lung cancer is quite clearly a major one, if not the major one. And the biggest cancer killer of all does not have a solid set of screening guidelines across Europe.

EAPM is driving forward the concept of personalised medicine in Europe and beyond, as set out in its ongoing STEPs campaign, and is working tirelessly to reach the goal of ‘the right treatment for the right patient at the right time’. This will go a long way towards creating a healthier Europe for its 500 million citizens across 28 countries.

Below are several good reasons why you should attend:

  • • An opportunity for you to learn more about the issues surrounding personalised medicine, its huge potential and how it can change the lives of millions of patients (including many of your constituents) for the better
  • • The chance to hear the opinions of experts first hand, as well as respond to and pose your own questions on the day
  • • The chance to understand how an integrated, coherent, cost-effective and cohesive EU health strategy will impact on systems and the standard of care in your own Member State
  • • The opportunity to see into the minds of all the stakeholders, understand their issues and find out what they really feel they need from you
  • • An excellent chance to network with (and be interviewed by) health journalists. Also, to meet industry leaders, cutting-edge scientists and all other PM stakeholders from your own country and across the EU
- Member State affiliates

EAPM’s fifth annual conference will take the theme: “Innovation and Screening in Lung Cancer - The Future” and will once again be held in the historic Bibliothèque Solvay in Brussels.

The Alliance’s fifth annual conference will, like the first four (held under the auspices of the Irish Presidency of the EU, and the Italian, Luxembourg and Dutch presidencies consecutively), pull together leading experts in the arena of personalised medicine drawn from patient groups, payers, healthcare professionals plus industry, science, academic and research representatives.

Also present will be legislators and policymakers in the form of MEPs and Commission officials. The aim of the conference is to set the agenda for European healthcare during the next five years of EU legislation.

As long ago as December 2003, EU health ministers unanimously adopted a Recommendation on cancer screening, which acknowledged both the significance of the burden of cancer and the evidence for effectiveness of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening in reducing the burden of disease. At that point, EU guidelines updated and expanded for breast and cervical cancer screening had already been published by the Commission, while comprehensive European guidelines for qual-ity assurance of colorectal cancer screening were being prepared. Thirteen years on and incidence and mortality rates of cancers still vary widely across the EU, reflecting a major health burden in various Member States, often splitting large and smaller countries along with richer and poorer nations. Therefore, there needs to be concrete actions at the EU level and Member State level. Despite the EU’s substantial efforts, overall the bloc is still only around half-way towards imple-menting the Recommendation. Not only that, but slightly less-than-half of the population who should be covered by screening (according to the Recommendation itself) actually are. Meanwhile, less-than-half of examinations performed as part of screening programmes actually meet with all the stipulations of that now-ageing Recommendation. This illustrates the need for greater efforts, supported by collaboration between Member States and professional, organisational and scientific support for those countries seeking to implement or improve population-based screening programmes.

The Alliance and the Commission both agree that substantial added value may be expected from such support and from additional efforts to improve and maintain the high quality of screen-ing programmes. It remains the case that the volume of activities is still far from the level which can be hoped for and worked towards in the future. In the last few years EAPM has been involved in shaping the agenda for the advancement of personalised medicine via conferences, meetings, reports, media engagement, its Working Groups and by helping to table many amendments in the European Parliament in relation to re-levant legislation.

EAPM believes there is a need for action across all disease areas - and lung cancer is quite clearly a major one, if not the major one. And the biggest cancer killer of all does not have a solid set of screening guidelines across Europe.

EAPM is driving forward the concept of personalised medicine in Europe and beyond, as set out in its ongoing STEPs campaign, and is working tirelessly to reach the goal of ‘the right treatment for the right patient at the right time’. This will go a long way towards creating a healthier Europe for its 500 million citizens across 28 countries.

Below are several good reasons why you should attend:

  • The chance to hear how an integrated, coherent, cost-effective and cohesive EU health strategy will impact on systems, finances and the standard of care in your own Member State
  • An opportunity for you to learn more about the issues surrounding PM from your fellow stakeholders, its huge potential and how it can change the lives of millions of patients for the better
  • The chance to hear the opinions of experts first hand, reply to and pose your own questions on the day
  • An excellent possibility to network with (and be interviewed by) health journalists. Also, to meet industry leaders, cutting-edge scientists and all other PM stakeholders from your own country and across the EU
  • The valuable opportunity to see into the minds of all the other stakeholders, understand their issues, find out what they need from you and to suggest what you need from them

SOCIAL MEDIA